Texas Flood chords by Stevie Ray Vaughan


Video blocked due to privacy settings

Change privacy settings


Texas Flood | Chords and lyrics (tune down 1/2 step)

Intro

| G7 (C7) | C7 (C9) | G7 | G7 (C C#) D7 |
| G7 | C7 | G7 | G7 |
| C7 | C7 | G7 | G7 |
| D7 | C7 | G7 C7 | G7 (C C#) D7 |

Verse 1

| G7 | C7 | G7 | G7 |
Well, it’s floodin’ down in Texas, all of the telephone lines are down.
| C7 | C7 | G7 | G7 |
Well, it’s floodin’ down in Texas, all of the telephone lines are down.
| D7 | C7 | G7 C7 | G7 (C C#) D7 |
And I’ve been tryin’ to call my baby, Lord and I can’t get a single sound.

Verse 2

| G7 | C7 | G7 | G7 |
Well, dark clouds are rollin’ in, man I’m standin’ out in the rain.
| C7 | C7 | G7 | G7 |
Well, dark clouds are rollin’ in, man I’m standin’ out in the rain.
| D7 | C7 | G7 C7 | G7 (C C#) D7 |
Yeah, flood water keep a rollin’, man it’s about to drive poor me insane.

Solo

||: G7 | C7 | G7 | G7 |
| C7 | C7 | G7 | G7 |
| D7 | C7 | G7 C7 | G7 (C C#) D7 :||

Verse 3

| G7 | C7 | G7 | G7 |
Well, I’m leavin’ you baby, Lord and I’m goin’ back home to stay.
| C7 | C7 | G7 | G7 |
Well, I’m leavin’ you baby, Lord and I’m goin’ back home to stay.
| D7 | C7 N.C | (G A# G A# C, C A# C#) | D5 G#7 G7 |
Well back home I know floods and tornadoes, baby the sun shines on me every day.


Texas Flood chords and progressions

Apart from the first four bars of the intro, Texas Flood is basically a slow 12-bar in G. Like this

||: G7 | C7 | G7 | G7 |
| C7 | C7 | G7 | G7 |
| D7 | C7 | G7 C7 | G7 (C C#) D7 :||

When you listen to the original recording, you’ll discover SRV has tuned down a semitone so what you hear is Gb but looking at the guitar, it’s in G.

Tuning down is not a bad idea actually, you can fit thicker strings that way and still bend. There is also something that happens to the sound of the guitar when you tune down, it seems to resonate better.

In an ideal world, I’d have one guitar always tuned to Eb, or even better, somewhere in between Eb and E to really hit that magic frequency of the universe.

To tune your guitar and find out more about that magic frequency, check out my free tuner.


SRV influences and legacy

John Mayer consistently mentions Stevie Ray Vaughan as an influence (Check out the solo of Belief to hear the SRV influence).

Other guitar greats to name SRV as an influence include Eric Johnson and even Eric Clapton who said:

“The first time I heard Stevie Ray, I thought: Whoever this is, he is going to shake the world. I was in my car and I remember thinking, I have to find out, before the day is over, who that guitar player is.”

Later on, Clapton and SRV became close friends and even did Stevie Ray’s last ever gig together, as they flew out in separate helicopters, SRV’s crashed.

Behind him, SRV left an endless amount of guitar players wanting to sound like him and no one else.

A great introduction to playing like SRV is to learn how to play Texas Flood, the video guitar lesson above demonstrates the most important licks, Sandy plays in standard tuning, SRV tuned down a half step.


Texas Flood | Related pages


Stevie Ray Vaughan

Launching himself in 1983 to the world with his debut album Texas Flood and simultaneously appearing on David Bowie’s Let’s Dance, SRV was an instant hit.

Following this up with Couldn’t Stand The Weather, Pride & Joy, and Mary Had A Little Lamb, he firmly established himself as one of the greats.

Go to Stevie Ray Vaughan.


Discontinued

Over the years, Spytunes have recorded many songs, some of these used to be in eBooks and courses but for one reason or another have been discontinued.

Since they have video guitar lessons, I’ve kept these and added chords and lyrics.

Go to Discontinued.


Song Book

As a guitarist, a repertoire is the greatest asset you can acquire. It is your ticket to playing with other musicians.

To help you on this journey, I’ve gathered tunes I play with acoustic duos, Jazz trios, Indie/Rock/Party bands as well as large Soul/Motown ensembles.

Go to Song Book.


Copyright + Comments

Studying great songs is the best way for a musician to develop, we believe displaying chords and lyrics falls under “fair use in education”.

If you are the copyright holder and do not wish to be represented in this way, or want to comment on anything in these lessons, do reach out.

Go to Contact.