Baby Won’t You Please Come Home chords by Clarence Williams


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Baby Won’t You Please Come Home | Chords + Lyrics


Intro

| D7 | B7 | Em7 | A7#5 |

Verse 1

| D7 | B7 | Em7 | A7 |
Baby won’t you please come home, ’cause your mama’s all alone.
| D7 | B7 | Em7 | A7 |
I have cried in vain, never no more to call your name.
| D7 | B7 | Em7 | A7 |
When you left you broke my heart, ’cause I never thought we’d part.

Turnaround 1

| G G#dim7 | A7 B7 |
Every hour in the day you hear me say,
| Em7 A7 | D7 B7 | Em7 A7 | D7 A7 |
baby please come home, baby please come home.

Solo

| D7 | B7 | Em7 | A7 |
| D7 | B7 | Em7 | A7 |
| D7 | B7 | Em7 | A7 |
| G7 G#dim7 | A7 B7 |
| Em7 A7 | D7 B7 | Em7 A7 | D7 A7 |

Verse 2

| D7 | B7 | Em7 | A7 |
Baby won’t you please come home, ’cause your mama’s all alone.
| D7 | B7 | Em7 | A7 |
I have cried in vain, never no more to call your name.
| D7 | B7 | Em7 | A7 |
When you left you broke my heart, ’cause I never thought we’d part.

Turnaround 2

| G G#dim7 | A7 B7 |
Every hour in the day you hear me say,
| Em7 A7 | D7 B7 | Em7 A7 | D7 B7 |
baby please come home, baby please come home.
| Em7 | Gm7 | D7 N.C | N.C D7 | D7 |
I said Baby, please come on home.



Baby Won’t You Please Come Home Chords: Learn the progressions


Baby Won't You Please Come Home chord analysis + TAB T

Baby Won’t You Please Come Home‘s chords are classic jazz/blues territory with its I7 – VIx – IIm7 – V7, for the main part, and two II – V – I progressions for the turnaround.

Here’s the verse progression:

||: D7 (I) | B7 (VIx) | Em7 (II) | A7 (V) :||

Let’s take a look at some TAB of how I played this in the video, notice how the strumming is “broken up”, as in I’m using more and fewer strings.

This is the intro and first 8 bars of the verse.

Baby Won't You Please Come Home intro and 8 bars of the verse

Members get complete TAB for the verse as well as the turnaround which starts on chord IV and ascends, a great contrast to the verse, like this:

| G (IV) G#dim7 (#IVdim7) | A7 (V) B7 (VIx) |
| Em7 (II) A7 (V) | D7 (I) B7 (VIx) |
| Em7 (II) A7 (V) | D7 (I) A7 (V) |

These two simple chord progressions set a great testing ground for you to practice your modal scales and arpeggios.

Let’s take a look into the jazz improviser’s theory brain.



Use Baby Won’t You Please Come Home to learn how to solo over a Jazz Standard using modes and arpeggios!

After you have played Baby Won’t You Please Come Home’s chord progressions and thought of what number they all have, keep this in mind as you solo.

In order to use modes and arpeggios for soloing over this piece, you need to use the new chord = new scale/arpeggio method.

Should the chord be an Em7, then you think chord II which means E Dorian, or an Em7 arpeggio. The Conspirian scale would also work.

For the A7, which is chord V, you could use a Major Pentatonic, Mixolydian, or a Dom7 arpeggio.

It is imperative that you can do this to any chord of the progression, anywhere on the neck. From here, the next step will be to arpeggio substitute. By doing so you will create a bigger sound.

For the A7, you could play a C#m7b5 arpeggio and automatically hit the dom9 extension.

You could even think of this chord as a place where you could extend to dom7b9, creating an altered sound,

Use the upper part of that idea (dom7b9) and you’ll find a Gdim7 arpeggio. A diminished arpeggio can be moved around in minor thirds, giving you the opportunity to move the same idea up or down the fretboard in minor thirds.

The rabbit hole goes seemingly deep, but really, it comes down to knowing the basics very well in all positions.

To achieve this, you must practice in all five CAGED positions and all twelve keys. In the course, we will do this, until that happens, the TAB for what I play in the video is available for members.

You also get a complete solo guide, listing all arpeggios and scales I used during the improvised solo.

Become a member today and get unlimited access to all step-by-step guitar coursesTAB for the songbook, the Self-Eliminating Practice Routine, and the eBook Spytunes Method – You can learn guitar!

Baby Won’t You Please Come Home is a Jazz Standard!

Baby Won’t You Please Come Home is a jazz/blues, written by Clarence Williams.

Sung by Bessie Smith, Nat King ColeFrank Sinatra, Ray Charles, and Ella Fitzgerald, it has earned the stripes to be referred to as a jazz standard.

As you learn Baby Won’t You Please Come Home, play the chord progression whilst simultaneously singing the root and saying the number of each chord as they pass by. Do this and you will soon feel the chords as Roman numerals.

You must make this switch from thinking of chords as names to Roman numerals in order to successfully play jazz solos, there is simply no other way.

If you find doing this too difficult in a jazz context, start by recognising my top 10 chord progressions.



Baby Won’t You Please Come Home Chords | Related Pages


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Among the Advanced Acoustic Songs, there are many more songs with chords like Baby Won't You Please Come Home.

The advanced acoustic tunes use big chord extensions and sometimes, unique and complex chords that incorporate open strings.

Study these in-depth and you will gain a complete understanding of the guitar fretboard, including how to build any scale, arpeggio, or chord.


Five similar tunes with chords and lyrics

When you can play Baby Won't You Please Come Home's chords, try these five tunes from the song book.


Clarence Williams

Clarence Williams wrote Baby Won't You Please Come Home.

Clarence Williams was an American jazz pianist, composer, promoter, vocalist, theatrical producer, and publisher.

Touring and recording with some of the most legendary blues artists of his time, Clarence Williams spent time with W.C Hardy, Bessie Smith, and Louis Armstrong.


Clarence Williams on the web

Listen to Clarence Williams on Spotify.


Blues & Jazz

Check out these Blues & Jazz tunes when you can play Baby Won't You Please Come Home.

The foundation upon which popular music stands, Blues & Jazz tunes must be explored in depth by the serious guitar player.

Learn from the best by studying the greatest tunes of the genres. Study the iconic licks and melodies to grasp the language of these most important styles.


About me

Dan Lundholm wrote this article about Baby Won't You Please Come Home's chords.

This article on Baby Won’t You Please Come Home’s chords was written by Dan LundholmDiscover more about him and learning guitar with Spytunes.

Most importantly, find out why you should learn guitar through playing tunes, not practising scales, and studying theory in isolation.


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