All Of Me chords by Real Book


Video blocked due to privacy settings

[rcb-consent type=”change” tag=”link” text=”Change privacy settings”]

All Of Me | Chords + Lyrics


Verse 1

| Cmaj7 | Cmaj7 | E7 | E7 |
All of me, why not take all of me?
| A7 | A7 | Dm | Dm |
Can’t you see, I’m no good without you.
| E7 | E7 | Am | Am |
Take my lips, I wanna lose them.
| D7 | D7 | Dm7 | G7 |
Take my arms, I’ll never use them.

Verse 2

| Cmaj7 | Cmaj7 | E7 | E7 |
Your goodbye left me with eyes that cry.
| A7 | A7 | Dm | Dm |
How can I, get along without you.
| F | Fm | Cmaj7 Em7 | A7 |
You took the part that once was my heart.
| Dm7 | G7 | C6 Ebdim7 | Dm7 G7 |
So why, why not take all of me?

Solo A

| Cmaj7 | Cmaj7 | E7 | E7 |
| A7 | A7 | Dm | Dm |
| E7 | E7 | Am | Am |
| D7 | D7 | Dm7 | G7 |

Solo B

| Cmaj7 | Cmaj7 | E7 | E7 |
| A7 | A7 | Dm | Dm |
| F | Fm | Cmaj7 Em7 | A7 |
| Dm7 | G7 | C6 Ebdim7 | Dm7 G7 |

Verse 3

| Cmaj7 | Cmaj7 | E7 | E7 |
All of me, come on, get all of me.
| A7 | A7 | Dm | Dm |
Can’t you see, I’m just a mess without you.
| E7 | E7 | Am | Am |
Take my lips, I wanna lose them.
| D7 | D7 | Dm7 | G7 |
Get a piece of these arms, I’ll never use them.

Verse 4

| Cmaj7 | Cmaj7 | E7 | E7 |
Your goodbye left me with eyes that cry.
| A7 | A7 | Dm | Dm |
How can I, ever make it without you.
| F | Fm | Cmaj7 Em7 | A7 |
You know, you got the part, used to be my heart.
| Dm7 | G7 | C6 Ebdim7 | Dm7 G7 |
So why, why not take all of me?



All Of Me Chords: Learn the progressions


All Of Me Guitar Lesson + TAB T

The funny thing about Jazz standards is that they all ended up in an illegal book called The Real Book which became the reference, rather than a particular version/recording by an artist.

There are an endless amount of recordings of All Of Me, but picking one is less useful than going for the Real Book version since that’s what all musicians use, or at least are familiar with.

With that in mind, let’s use this and consider the way musicians have been practising using jazz standards as our game plan!

We start with comping the chords using the concept of the “closest possible shape”. I’ve written this in TAB for members, here’s the A section (verses 1 and 3) as a preview:

All Of Me chords and TAB, A section.

The chords you saw above, using Roman Numerals, are this:

A-section

| Cmaj7 (I) | Cmaj7 | E7 (IIIx) | E7 |
| A7 (VIx) | A7 | Dm (II) | Dm |
| E7 (IIIx) | E7 | Am (VI) | Am |
| D7 (IIx) | D7 | Dm7 (II) | G7 (V) |

As you can see, there are some classic variations here as we make the III, VI, and II chords major. This is great for your improvisation practice.

Here’s the B section using Roman numerals, it starts in the same way.

B-section

| Cmaj7 (I) | Cmaj7 | E7 (IIIx) | E7 |
| A7 (VIx) | A7 | Dm (II) | Dm |
| F (IV) | Fm (IVm) | Cmaj7 (I) Em7 (III) | A7 (VIx) |
| Dm7 (II) | G7 (V) | C6 (I) Ebdim7 (bIIIdim7) | Dm7 (II) G7 (V) |

In the B section, we get a IVm, a III without being major and a turnaround using a dim7 chord. All these are great to practice your jazz language over.

However, playing All Of Me’s chords well is the first step. It is without a doubt in your best interest to not move on to walking bass, melody and improvisation until you can comp it with ease.

Here’s a link to the complete lesson where you get the TAB for comping both sections using two different starting positions (members only): All Of Me – Guitar Lesson with TAB.



Learn how to play guitar by studying jazz standards such as All Of Me!

The best thing about jazz standards and learning how to play guitar through studying them is that it’s all there.

You’ve got the chords which can be played using the concept of the closest possible shape.

Simply pick a starting point and then move to the closest possible shape. Next time, pick a new starting point.

You’ve got the walking bass line which is great arpeggio practice in the lower area. When you can do this, you’ve taken the first step to playing through changes when improvising, in fact, you’re already doing it by playing the walking bass.

I would recommend you start with recording your comping on a loop pedal, then add the walking bass.

Next, you’ve got the melody, which if you think of it as intervals in relation to the chords will teach you to read, phrase, and improvise as you can start your improvisation by developing the melody which would be the next step.

Finally, you improvise. It’s incredibly important that you comp, walk the bass, play the melody, and develop the melody before you solo!

If you go through this process for every jazz standard you learn, you will learn how to play the guitar in a musical way.

The next step would be to take the tune through all 12 keys. This is the formula Jazz Saxophone players use and why they are so good.

As All Of Me’s chords are in the key of C and use several classic movements it makes it one of the best jazz standards to practice.



All Of Me Chords | Related Pages


Advanced Acoustic

Check out the Advanced Acoustic Songs for more tunes with chords like All Of Me.

The advanced acoustic tunes use big chord extensions and sometimes, unique and complex chords that incorporate open strings.

Study these in-depth and you will gain a complete understanding of the guitar fretboard, including how to build any scale, arpeggio, or chord.


Five similar tunes with chords and lyrics

When you can play All Of Me's chords, try these five tunes from the song book.


Frank Sinatra tunes

Frank Sinatra recorded All Of Me.

Frank Sinatra‘s legacy might best be summed up by Stephen Holden who wrote for the 1983 Rolling Stone Record Guide:

“Frank Sinatra’s voice is pop music history. Like Presley and Dylan – Sinatra will last indefinitely. He virtually invented modern pop song phrasing.”


Frank Sinatra on the web

Listen to Frank Sinatra on Spotify.


Blues & Jazz

When you can play All Of Me, check out these Blues & Jazz tunes as well.

The foundation upon which popular music stands, Blues & Jazz tunes must be explored in depth by the serious guitar player.

Learn from the best by studying the greatest tunes of the genres. Study the iconic licks and melodies to grasp the language of these most important styles.


About me | Dan Lundholm

Dan Lundholm wrote this article about All Of Me's chords.

This was a guitar lesson about All Of Me chords, by Dan Lundholm. Discover more about him and learn guitar with Spytunes.

Most importantly, find out why you should learn guitar through playing tunes, not practising scales, and studying theory in isolation.



FOLLOW SPYTUNES

Share this page