Annie’s Song chords by John Denver


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Annie’s Song | Chords + Lyrics


Intro

| 6/8 D Dsus4 | D Dsus2 |
| D Dmaj7 | D6 D5 |

Verse 1

| G A | Bm G | D F#m/C# |
You fill up my senses, like a night in a forest.
| Bm A | G F#m |
Like the mountains in springtime.
| Em G | A A6 | A7 Asus4 A |
Like a walk in the rain.
| G A | Bm G | D F#m/C# |
Like a storm in the desert, like a sleepy blue ocean.
| Bm A | G F#m | Em A | D Dsus4 | D5 |
You fill up my senses, come fill me again.

Verse 2

| G A | Bm G | D F#m/C# |
Come let me love you, let me give my life to you.
| Bm A | G F#m |
Let me drown in your laughter.
| Em G | A A6 | A7 Asus4 A |
Let me die in your arms.
| G A | Bm G | D F#m/C# |
Let me lay down beside you, let me always be with you.
| Bm A | G F#m | Em A | D Dsus4 | D5 |
Come let me love you, come love me again.

Instrumental

| G A | Bm G | D F#m/C# |
| Bm A | G F#m |
| Em G | A A6 | A7 Asus4 A |
| G A | Bm G | D F#m/C# |
Let me give my life to you
| Bm A | G F#m | Em A | D Dsus4 | D5 |
Come let me love you, come love me again.

Verse 3

| G A | Bm G | D F#m/C# |
You fill up my senses, like a night in a forest.
| Bm A | G F#m |
Like the mountains in springtime.
| Em G | A A6 | A7 Asus4 A |
Like a walk in the rain.
| G A | Bm |3/4 Bm |6/8 D F#m/C# |
Like a storm in the desert, like a sleepy blue ocean.
| Bm A | G F#m | Em A | D Dsus4 | D Dsus2 | D Dsus4 | D |
You fill up my senses, come fill me again.



Annie’s Song Chords: Learn the progressions


Annie's Song Analysis + TAB

To play finger-style acoustic guitar as John does, you must practice set patterns, apply these to all chords, and then start to mix things up.

Members use TAB as they work through two different patterns, and practice these before they start changing them in an improvised way.

Annie’s Song’s chord progression is the same throughout. We’re in the key of D and don’t break any harmonic rules.

The verse does go on a long journey before partially repeating. Let’s look at the movement of each line, we start on chord IV, like this:

| G (IV) A (V) | Bm (VI) G (IV) | D (I) F#m/C# (III/5) |

I like how we start with IV – V, this is usually a movement for a bridge as it builds tension. the final band goes from I down to III but the 5th in the bass jints of the VII chord.

The next line is only two bars, using the same chords again, but in a different order, like this:

| Bm (VI) A (V) | G (IV) F#m (III) |

Next, we go to a new chord, an Em (chord II), up to its relative major and then peak at V, with some extensions, like this:

| Em (II) G (IV) | A (V) A6 | A7 Asus4 A |

It’s now been 8 bars and we repeat the chords and melody with new words, only the last three bars are new as we go II – V – I, like this:

| G A | Bm G | D F#m/C# |
| Bm A | G F#m | Em (II) A (V) | D (I) Dsus4 | D5 |

As mentioned, members get two different patterns to practice this long progression before they let go and improvise. This leaves us with only one more section to solve, the intro.

Two guitars are playing on the original recording so I had to invent a hybrid version which you can use if you’re playing Annie’s Song on your own, I’d like to give you the TAB for that intro already now.

Annie's Song, chords and TAB, intro.

Here’s a link to the full lesson (members only): Annie’s Song – Guitar Lesson with TAB.

Become a member today and get unlimited access to all step-by-step guitar coursesTAB for the songbook, the Self-Eliminating Practice Routine, and the eBook Spytunes Method.

Annie’s Song – One of 8 #1’s in a row!

Annie’s Song was released in 1974. By now, John Denver was a well-established artist, this was from his 8th studio album.

The tune reached #1 in the U.K., U.S., Canada, and Ireland, selling over 2 million copies worldwide.

Speaking of the numbers 1 and 8, this was one of 8 #1’s in a row from John Denver, starting with Sunshine On My Shoulders in 1973, Annie’s Song, Back Home Again, and Sweet Surrender in 1974. Thank God I’m A Country Boy, I’m Sorry, and Fly Away in 1975.

This string of #1’s finished in 1976 with Looking For Space. After releasing It Makes Me Giggle, John had his last ever #1 with Like A Sad Song, also in 1976 – impressive stuff!



Annie’s Song Chords | Related Pages


Intermediate Acoustic

There are many more Intermediate Acoustic Songs with chords similar to Annie's Song.

Most intermediate acoustic tunes can’t be played using just basic open-position chords. We have to move up the fretboard and play CAGED barre chords as well.

We incorporate bass lines, add licks, extend chords, and play vocal melodies. Most importantly, we’ll invent second guitar parts and play these songs together.


Five similar tunes with chords and lyrics

When you can play Annie's Song's chords, try these five tunes from the song book.

John Denver

John Denver wrote Annie's Song.

Country legend John Denver had his golden years during the late 60s and early 70s as he was recording other people’s tunes and writing his own.

His best work includes Leaving, on A Jet Plane, Take Me Home, Country Roads, Annie’s Song, and Thank God I’m a Country Boy.



John Denver on the web

Listen to John Denver on Spotify.

Ballads

There are many more Ballads with similar chords to Annie's Song.

The perfect first dance or an emotional piece for your next audition, this collection of Ballads is great for working on your expression.

Learn tunes from Burt Bacharach, Eric Clapton, Paul Simon, Eva Cassidy, Ben Harper, Etta James, Chet Baker, Elvis, Norah Jones, and many more.


Country & Folk

When you can play Annie's Song, try these Country and Folk tunes as well.

In the primarily acoustic genres of Country & Folk, you must acquire what matters the most: A repertoire. Nothing else will give you the gig.

Learn tunes by Johnny Cash, Dolly Parton, Simon & Garfunkel, Bob Dylan, Neil Young, America, Don McLean, and many more.


About me

Dan Lundholm wrote Annie's Song's chords.

This article on Annie’s Song’s chords was written by Dan Lundholm. Discover more about him and how learning guitar with Spytunes has evolved.

Most importantly, find out why you should learn guitar through playing tunes, not practising scales, and studying theory in isolation.


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