Blowin’ In The Wind chords by Bob Dylan


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Blowin’ In The Wind chords and lyrics – Capo 7

Intro

| G |

Verse 1

| G C G/B | D/A D G | G C G/B | G |
How many roads must a man walk down, before you call him a man?
| G C G/B | D/A D G | G C G/B | D D/A D D/A |
Yes, and how many seas must a white dove sail, before she sleeps in the sand?
| G C G/B | D/A D/F# G | G C G/B | G |
Yes, and how many times must the cannonballs fly, before they’re forever banned?

Chorus 1

| C G/B D/A D/F# | G C C/G | C G/B D/A D | 2/4 G |
The answer my friend is blowin’ in the wind, the answer is blowin’ in the wind.

Instrumental 1

| C G/B D D/A D/F# | G C C/G | C G/B D/F# | G |

Verse 2

| G C G/B | D/A D G | G C G/B | G |
How many years can a mountain exist, before it’s washed to the sea?
| G C G/B | D/A D G | G C G/B | D D/A D D/A |
Yes, and how many years can some people exist, before they’re allowed to be free?
| G C G/B | D/A D/F# G | G C G/B | G |
Yes, and how many times can a man turn his head, pretending he just doesn’t see?

Chorus 2

| C G/B D/A D/F# | G C C/G | C G/B D/A D | 2/4 G |
The answer my friend is blowin’ in the wind, the answer is blowin’ in the wind.

Instrumental 2

| C G/B D D/A D/F# | G C C/G | C G/B D/F# | G |

Verse 3

| G C G/B | D/A D G | G C G/B | G |
How many times must a man look up, before he can see the sky?
| G C G/B | D/A D G | G C G/B | D D/A D D/A |
Yes, and how many ears must one man have, before he can hear people cry?
| G C G/B | D/A D/F# G | G C G/B | G |
Yes, and how many deaths will it take till he knows, that too many people have died?

Chorus 3

| C G/B D/A D/F# | G C C/G | C G/B D/A D | 2/4 G |
The answer my friend is blowin’ in the wind, the answer is blowin’ in the wind.

Outro

| C G/B D D/A D/F# | G C C/G | C G/B D/F# | G |


You can learn how to play Blowin’ In The Wind!

Blowin’ In The Wind was Bob Dylan‘s breakthrough song. Fifty years later, he still plays it live.

The original part was played as if in the key of G, using a capo on fret seven, it comes out in the key of D.

My arrangement is an attempt to play it just like Bob did, note for note. However, in the course, we first learn a simplified version using a capo on fret 2, thinking in the key of C.

Following this, we learn it just like Bob played it. There are TAB and practice loops for individual sections as well as complete performances of the full song with a singer.

Finally, there is also a 2nd guitar part that we construct by learning from how Bob played it, transposed to the open position. We now think in D and only pick the notes.

Learning all three versions of the song will ensure that you do not just learn how to play Blowin’ In The Wind, but also learn from the song.

It also means you can play the song with me and the singer as if we were a folk trio.

Below, you find the video lesson that looks at how to play the individual parts, just like Bob did it back in 1963, enjoy!


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Blowin’ In The Wind verse, chorus, instrumental chords and strumming

Let’s play Blowin’ In The Wind, note-for-note, just like Bob Dylan did on the Freewheelin’ album.

The capo is on fret 7, the TAB is extremely detailed, and you may need several days of practice to nail this!

Example 1 is the intro and verse, which look like this.

Blowin’ In The Wind – Capo 7 – Verse

Spend plenty of time practicing the verse before you move on to example 2, the chorus, which is much shorter!

Blowin’ In The Wind – Capo 7 – Chorus

Finally, let’s also play the instrumental section on a loop. In the playlist above, referred to as example 3.

Use the TAB loop or a metronome at a different tempo, gradually bringing this up to speed.

Blowin’ In The Wind – Capo 7 – Instrumental

What you saw above was step 6 of the course.

For the complete picture, with 8 lessons like this, exploring how to play Blowin’ In The Wind in other ways as well as technical exercises to get you there, sign up here.

Blowin’ In The Wind background and legacy

Blowin’ In The Wind is a song from the 1963 album, The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan. This wasn’t Dylan’s first album and he still mainly played covers at this point but Blowin’ In The Wind was his own song, quickly covered by his contemporary peers!

In fact, Peter Paul & Mary actually charted with the song way before Dylan did with his own version.

Blowin’ In The Wind is often used as an example of a protest song, posing philosophical questions about peace, war, and freedom. American teens in the 60s couldn’t get enough of it and Dylan became an icon.

Dylan has recorded a number of albums following this, now legendary early release. Even though he is now past half a century as an active recording artist, for many he still remains the one-man band that sang Blowin’ In The Wind, The Times They Are A-Changing, and Don’t Think Twice, It’s All Right.

In 1999, Blowin’ In The Wind was inducted into the Grammy Hall Of Fame. In 2004, it was listed as #14 on Rolling Stone Magazine’s list of The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.


Blowin’ In The Wind | Related pages


Blowin’ In The Wind – 8 Guitar Lessons

Bob Dylan’s first hit, Blowin’ In The Wind was originally played using a capo on fret 7, thinking in the key of G.

During the 8 lessons, you’ll learn it just like Bob played it but why stop there? We also play it with a capo on fret 2 (key of C) as well as without a capo (key of D).

Go to Blowin’ In The Wind – 8 Guitar Lessons.


Bob Dylan

Widely regarded as the most influential artist in popular culture, Bob Dylan has been covered and copied by almost everyone who ever attempted to write a song.

Some might even say he invented modern songwriting.

Go to Bob Dylan.


Intermediate Acoustic Songs

Intermediate Acoustic Guitar Songs

The intermediate songs can not be played using just basic open-position chords. We have to move up the fretboard and play CAGED barre chords as well.

We incorporate bass lines, licks, extend chords, and play vocal melodies. Most importantly, we invent 2nd guitar parts and play these songs together.

Go to Intermediate Acoustic Songs.


Song Book

As a guitarist, a repertoire is the greatest asset you can acquire. It is your ticket to playing with other musicians.

To help you on this journey, I’ve gathered tunes I play with acoustic duos, Jazz trios, Indie/Rock/Party bands as well as large Soul/Motown ensembles.

Go to Song Book.


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