Lyin’ Eyes chords by the Eagles


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Lyin’ Eyes | Chords + Lyrics


Intro

| G | Gmaj7 (G) | C | Cmaj13 |
| Am7 | D6add4 | G (C/G) | G (C/G) |

Verse 1

| G | G | C | C |
City girls just seem to find out early.
| Am | Am | D | D |
How to open doors with just a smile.
| G | G | C | C |
A rich old man and she won’t have to worry.
| Am | C | G | G (C/G) |
She’ll dress up all in lace, go in style.

Verse 2

| G | G | C | C |
Late at night, a big old house gets lonely.
| Am | Am | D | D (D7) |
I guess every form of refuge has its price.
| G | G (Gmaj7) | C | C |
And it breaks her heart to think her love is only.
| Am | C | G | C D5 |
Given to a man with hands as cold as ice.

Verse 3

| G | G | C | C |
So she tells him she must go out for the evening.
| Am | Am | D Dsus2 | D7 D6 |
To comfort an old friend who’s feeling down.
| G | Gmaj7 | C | C |
But he knows where she’s going as she’s leaving.
| Am | C | G (C/G) | G N.C |
She is headed for the cheatin’ side of town.

Chorus 1

| G | C/G | G (C/G) | G (/F#) |
You can’t hide your lyin’ eyes.
| Em7 | Bm7 | Am7 | D7 |
And your smile is a thin disguise.
| G | G7 | C | A7 |
I thought by now you’d realize.
| Am | D7omit3 |
There ain’t no way to hide your lyin’ eyes.

Instrumental 1

| G | Gmaj7 (G) | C | Cmaj13 |
| Am7 | D6add4 | G (C/G) | G (C/G) |

Verse 4

| G | G | C | C |
On the other side of town a boy is waiting.
| Am | Am | D | D (D7) |
With fiery eyes and dreams no one could steal.
| G | G (Gmaj7) | C | C |
She drives on through the night, anticipating.
| Am | C | G | C D5 |
‘Cause he makes her feel the way she used to feel.

Verse 5

| G | G | C | C |
She rushes to his arms, they fall together.
| Am | Am | D | D (D7) |
She whispers that “it’s only for a while”.
| G | G | C | C |
She swears that soon she’ll be comin’ back forever.
| Am | C | G (C/G) | G N.C |
She goes away and leaves him with a smile.

Chorus 2

| G | C/G | G (C/G) | G |
You can’t hide your lyin’ eyes.
| Em7 | Bm7 | Am7 | D7 |
And your smile is a thin disguise.
| G | G7 | C | A7 |
I thought by now you’d realize.
| Am7 | D7omit3 |
There ain’t no way to hide your lyin’ eyes.

Instrumental 2

| G | Gmaj7 (G) | C | Cmaj13 |
| Am7 | D6add4 | G (C/G) | G (C/G) |

Verse 6

| G | G | C | C |
She gets up and pours herself a strong one.
| Am | Am | D | D7omit3 |
And stares out at the stars up in the sky.
| G | G | C | C |
Another night, it’s gonna be a long one.
| Am | C | G | C D5 |
She draws the shade and hangs her head to cry.

Verse 7

| G | Gmaj7 | C | C |
She wonders how it ever got this crazy.
| Am | Am | D Dsus2 | D7 D6 |
She thinks about a boy she knew in school.
| G | G | C | C |
Did she get tired or did she just get lazy?
| Am | C | G | G (C/G) |
She’s so far gone, she feels just like a fool.

Verse 8

| G | G (Gmaj7) | C | C |
My, oh my, you sure know how to arrange things.
| Am | Am | D Dsus2 | D7 D6 |
You set it up so well, so carefully.
| G | Gmaj7 | C | C |
Ain’t it funny how your new life didn’t change things?
| Am | C | G (C/G) | G N.C |
You’re still the same old girl you used to be.

Chorus 3

| G | C/G | G (C/G) | G |
You can’t hide your lyin’ eyes.
| Em7 | Bm7 | Am7 | D7omit3 |
And your smile is a thin disguise.
| G | G7 | C | A7 |
I thought by now you’d realize.
| Am | D7 | G | Gmaj7 (G) |
There ain’t no way to hide your lyin’ eyes.
| Am7 | D7omit3 | G | Gmaj7 (G) |
There ain’t no way to hide your lyin’ eyes.
| Am7 | D7omit3 | G | Gmaj7 (G) |
Honey, you can’t hide your lyin’ eyes.

Outro

| Am7 | D7omit3 | G Gsus4 G Gadd9 | G |



Lyin’ Eyes Chords: Learn the progressions!


Lyin' Eyes Analysis + TAB T

Almost completely diatonic to the key of G, the impressive part of the Eagles Lyin’ Eyes chords is not how they modulate, it’s how they subtly change from one verse to another.

Another tune that does this really well is John Paul Young’s Love Is In The Air.

Should you learn Lyin’ Eyes exactly as I’ve written above using chords and lyrics? For example, the DDsus2D7D6 movement in verses 3 and 7 only? If you play it on your own, yes, but in a band, it would be pointless unless everyone does it.

You should perhaps mainly study how these subtle changes affect the arrangement and learn from it so that when you’ve written a song that needs similar treatment, you have a great reference.

The basic chord progression of a Lyin’ Eyes verse is this:

| G (I) | G | C (IV) | C |
| Am (II) | Am | D (V) | D |
| G | G | C | C |
| Am | C | G | G |

All verses vary slightly in extensions. The main thing to look out for is the last line which is important to get right.

We either stay on G and use a quick C/G, or move GCD5. Before a chorus, go from GC/GG, and hold that last G chord.

In contrast to the elaborate verses, the chorus, which happens three times is always the same, like this:

| G (I) | C/G (IV/5) | G (C/G) | G |
| Em7 (VI) | Bm7 (III) | Am7 (II) | D7 (V) |
| G | G7 | C | A7 (IIx) |
| Am | D7omit3 |

To me, the Bm7 (chord III) is the peak of the song, it’s so unexpected. Notice how this part of the chorus has the movement of a E minor blues (compare it with Ain’t No Sunshine’s chords). This is linked with a II – V – I.

Once we repeat the final line, the Am turns into an Am7. As for the D7omit3, you could make a case for a plain D7 as well, I just felt it worked better without that 3rd.

You could probably argue that those initial C/G chords are actually C chords as the bass guitar does go to a C, but I reckon if it’s just you on one guitar, C/G sounds better.

Finally, the A7 is not diatonic, it’s a IIx and the G7 could be filed under the category of “outside” as well, its function is to lead to C (chord IV) more clearly.

After the last two bars of the chorus, we go straight into an instrumental section which is also what happened during the intro, it looks like this:

| G (I) | Gmaj7 (G) | C (IV) | Cmaj13 |
| Am7 (II) | D6add4 (V) | G (C/G) | G (C/G) |

After spending a few hours transcribing Lyin’ Eyes, and arranging it so it works on just one guitar, here’s what I came up with for that intro.

Members get TAB for how to play all other sections as well, adapted to work on just one acoustic guitar, here’s a link to the complete lesson (members only): Lyin’ Eyes – Guitar lesson with TAB.

Become a member today and get unlimited access to all step-by-step guitar coursesTAB for the songbook, the Self-Eliminating Practice Routine, and the eBook Spytunes Method.


Lyin’ Eyes – The edited radio version

There is a shorter, more radio-friendly 4-minute version of Lyin’ Eyes. What they’ve done is take out verses 4, 5, and 7, as well as chorus 2.

As you’re unlikely to be singing this in harmony on a gig without rehearsing it, you don’t need to worry about getting caught out.

I’d also like to point out how this must be the worst wedding song of all time, but saying that, I’ve lost count of how many times I’ve played I Heard It Through The Grapevine in that environment so you never know!



Lyin’ Eyes Chords | Related Pages


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Five similar tunes with chords and lyrics

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Their best tunes include Take It Easy, Hotel California, Lyin’ Eyes, Life In The Fast Lane, One Of These Nights, and Take It To The Limit.


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About me

About Me Dan Lundholm T

This article was written by Dan Lundholm, Spytunes guitar guru. Discover more about him and how learning guitar with Spytunes has evolved.

Most importantly, find out why you should learn guitar through playing tunes, not practising scales, and studying theory in isolation.


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